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PC Control These demos and projects allow the robot to be controlled via a computer.

ArbotiX Commander Control - These demos and projects control the Robot using the ArbotiX Commander, the handheld Arduino based remote control.

Direct Control - These demos and projects control the Robot directly from sensors connected directly to the Robot's control board.

Pose Control - These demos and projects allow you to create and playback a sequence of poses.

Serial Control - These demos and projects control the robot using a serial packet protocol.

Standalone - These demos and projects are deisgned to let your robot function without a computer or additional microcontroller.

Wireless Control - These demos and projects allow you to control the robot wirelessly - usually by replacing the Serial Connection with XBee modules.

Reference - These articles have technical details regarding the control and operation of the robot.

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More info here

LIDAR Light Getting Started Guide

The LIDAR Lite is an extremely affordable laser range detection sensor. The LIDAR Lite can measure distances from 0-40 m with an accuracy of +/- 2.5 cm. This data can easily be interfaced with a microcontroller via PWM or I2C. This module is ideal for robotics, allowing a robot to measure the distance of objects around it and navigate its environment.

This sensor is a perfect companion to your InterbotiX or RobotGeek robot, adding precise range detection at the cost of only 4 pins on your board. We include M3 standoffs and angle brackets to make it easy to mount your LIDAR to any of our centimeter grid patterns.

This article will discuss connecting the LIDAR Lite to the following boards:

  • Geekduino / Arduino, directly
  • Geekduino / Arduino, using a RobotGeek Sensor Shield and sensor cable
  • ArbotiX-M Robocontroller using a sensor cable

LIDAR Lite Pinout

Connection diagram for ArbotiX Robocontroller to LIDAR Lite

The LIDAR Lite comes with a cable that plugs into the LIDAR Lite and breaks out the 6 pins on the unit. The 5v input power is the only cable that is color-coded (red). All other pins share the same color (black).

The pins on the LIDAR Lite are not numbered, so the numbering in the table below assumes '1' is the top pin (ground/black) and '6' is the bottom pin (5v/red).

Pin Function
1
2 SDA
3 SCL
4 Mode
5 Power Enable
6 5v

For this document we will focus on I2C communications, so we will only need to worry about 4 pins: 5v, Ground, SDA and SCL.

Connecting the LIDAR Lite to an Arduino/Geekduino

Connection diagram for Geekduino Arduino to LIDAR Lite

Connecting a LIDAR Lite directly to your Geekduino/Arduino is very straight-forward. Simply connect the 4 LIDAR pins as shown in the table/diagram.

If you find that the cables from the LIDAR Lite are slipping out of your Arduino, we recommend soldering Male Jumper Cables to the cables to make them more secure.

LIDAR Lite Pin Geekduino/Arduino Pin
5v 5v
GND GND
SDA A4 / Analog 4
SCL A5 / Analog 5

Connecting the LIDAR Lite to an RobotGeek Sensor Shield

Connection diagram for robotgeek shield to lidar lite

To connect the LIDAR Lite to a RobotGeek Sensor Shield, you will first need to solder 4 of the LIDAR Lite cables to a 4-pin header. Each LIDAR Lite comes with a 4-pin sensor cable that you can cut in half and solder to the LIDAR Lite Cable.

LIDAR Lite Pin 4-pin header color
5v Red
GND Black
SDA White
SCL Yellow

Connecting the LIDAR Lite to an RobotGeek Sensor Shield

Connection diagram for ArbotiX Robocontroller to LIDAR Lite

To connect the LIDAR Lite to a RobotGeek Sensor Shield, you will first need to solder each of the 4 LIDAR Lite cables to a female connector. Each LIDAR Lite comes with a 4-pin squid sensor cable. You can cut off the individual female jumpers and solder to the LIDAR Lite Cable.

LIDAR Lite Pin 4-pin header color
5v Red
GND Black
SDA White
SCL Yellow
LIDAR Lite Pin ArbotiX Pin
5v D16 Power Pin
GND D16 Ground Pin
SDA D16 Data Pin
SCL D17 Data Pin

Using the LIDAR Lite

Pulsed Light has made multiple examples for the LIDAR Lte available on their GitHub Page.

The quickest way to get started is by downloading the LIDARLite_Basics code and load the LIDARLite_Wire_Library_GetDistance_ContinuousRead firmware. You can then open the Serial Monitor to see the distance data.

LIDARLite_Wire_Library_GetDistance_ContinuousRead uses Arduino's default Wire library to communicate with the LIDAR Lite. However, Pulsed Light recommends using the I2C Master Library from DSS. If you install this Library, the LIDAR Lite can act more effectively. To test the library, you can load the LIDARLite_I2C_Library_GetDistance_ContinuousRead firmware onto your Geekduino/Arduino and open the serial port to see the incoming data.

Additionally, if you are using the I2C Master Library, you can also try the LIDARLite_StateMachine firmware. When you open the Serial Terminal you will be able to issue commands to the Lidar and get distance and velocity readings.

LIDAR LITE Demos

LIDAR Lite Mapping with DYNAMIXEL Servos

This Demo will allow you to scan and map the perimeter of a room using a LIDAR Lite and DYNAMIXEL servos.

Mapping the room with the LIDAR lite and a WidowX turret

A video posted by Trossen Robotics (@trossenrobotics) on

LIDAR Lite Hexapod Demo

This Demo will make the PhantomX Hexapod move back and forth based on input from the LIDAR Lite